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Tasmania - Collaborators and Marine Technology

At Down Deep Drones we have been fortunate to visit Tasmania for the last five months whilst researching, and refining our underwater remotely operated vehicles, and have seen first hand wonderful collaborations between various groups acting for the health of our oceans.

The ocean surrounding the beautiful island state of Tasmania, located south of mainland Australia, plays a vital role in the economy and culture of the area, providing a home for a diverse range of marine life and supporting industries such as fishing, tourism, and shipping. However, the ocean is also facing a range of threats, including marine debris, invasive species, and climate change. Fortunately, many groups in Tasmania are working together to protect and preserve the ocean and its inhabitants.

These groups include researchers, non-profit organisations, government agencies including local councils, and community activists. They all share a common goal of preserving the natural beauty and diversity of Tasmania's marine environment.




IMAS ,

Institute for Marine and Invasive Species mas.utas.edu.au/imas/contact-us is a world-class research institute that focuses on the sustainable use and management of marine resources. It has a strong focus on understanding and managing the impacts of climate change on the ocean and its ecosystems, and also works on issues such as marine debris, invasive species, and the protection of endangered species. IMAS has a number of research projects underway in these areas, including studies on the impacts of plastic pollution on marine life.


TLC,

Tasmanian Land Conservancy asland.org.au is a non-profit organisation that works to protect the natural values of Tasmania. The TLC has a strong focus on protecting the marine environment, particularly through its work on coastal conservation. It has established a number of coastal reserves and works with local communities to manage and protect these areas. The TLC also works on issues such as marine debris, with a focus on reducing the amount of plastic waste entering the ocean.


PWS,

Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service, https://parks.tas.gov.au/ is responsible for the management and protection of Tasmania's national parks, reserves, and other protected areas, including marine reserves. It works to conserve and protect the marine environment, including endangered and threatened species such as the Tasmanian devil. PWS also works on issues such as marine debris, with a focus on educating visitors about the impacts of littering and the importance of keeping the coast and ocean clean.


CSIRO

Commonwealth Science Industrial and Research Organisation https://www.csiro.au/en/about/locations/state-locations/tas/hobart is Australia's national science agency, and has a strong presence in Tasmania. It works on a range of marine-related issues, including the impacts of climate change, marine biodiversity, and the sustainable use of marine resources. It has a number of research projects underway in Tasmania, including studies on the impacts of ocean acidification on marine life.



Image credit Tim Phillips

The Marine Conservation Program at the University of Tasmania is focused on the conservation and management of marine ecosystems. It works on a range of issues, including marine debris, invasive species, and the protection of endangered species such as the southern right whale.


AMCS works to protect the ocean and its inhabitants through advocacy, campaigning, and education. It has a strong focus on issues such as marine debris and the protection of endangered species, and works with local communities to raise awareness about these issues and advocate for change.


TCT works to protect the natural values of Tasmania, including the marine environment. It also has a strong focus on issues such as marine debris, invasive species, and the protection of endangered species, and works with local communities to raise awareness. TCT also runs a range of educational programs aimed at promoting the importance of the marine environment and its conservation.




Remotely Operated Vehicles and Marine Conservation Use


In terms of the use of ROVs, many of these groups are using these devices to study and monitor the marine environment. For example, MAS has used ROVs to study deep-sea ecosystems and monitor the impacts of climate change on these ecosystems. The CSIRO has also used ROVs to study marine biodiversity and the impacts of climate change on the ocean. These devices are becoming increasingly important tools for marine research, allowing scientists to study and monitor the ocean in ways that were previously impossible.


These efforts are critical for the health and sustainability of the ocean and its inhabitants. Fortunately, Tasmania is home to a diverse range of passionate and dedicated individuals and groups working towards these goals. By collaborating and sharing knowledge, they are making significant strides towards protecting the marine environment and ensuring a sustainable future for Tasmania and beyond.






Tasmania - Embracing Technology for the Environment

Please check in soon to find other blogs on how and where we are discovering technology at use around the globe to benefit our oceans.

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